The story

Paul Trevillion

Paul Trevillion


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Paul Trevillion was born in Tottenham in 1934. Three years later he was commissioned by the People for the weekly strip, "Hey Ref".

Trevillion also contributed drawings of footballers for The Sporting Review, Sport Express and the Evening Standard. In the 1950s he produced portraits of famous footballers as part of the Soccer Sketchbook series. He also provided drawings of people such as Winston Churchill.

In the late 1950s Trevillion became the artist who was responsible for the Roy of the Rovers strip in the Tiger comic. In 1969 Trevillion began work for Shoot Magazine. This included the You are the Ref strip. In 1970 he created a great deal of controversy when he drew Evonne Goolagong in the nude for The Sun newspaper.

Trevillion has provided the drawings for several books including Dead Heat: Ryder Cup Classic (1969), World Football at Your Feet (1970), King Pele (1971), Soccer Skills (1992), World Cup Masterpieces (1998), You are the Ref (2006) and Celebrating 50 Years of Sporting Art (2007).

Trevillion then moved to the United States where he worked with Mark McCormack. He returned to the England and in 2006 he drew the You are the Ref strip for The Observer.


You Are The Ref

You Are The Ref is a British comic strip which has run in various publications since 1957, featuring a series of improbable hypothetical football scenarios that then invites the reader to make the refereeing decision. Created by sports artist Paul Trevillion, also famous for Roy of the Rovers, the strip features contributions from several top referees, and was collected into an official book in 2006. [1] From 2006 to 2016 it featured online on theguardian.com. [2] and in The Observer newspaper.


Rare Signed Portrait

SIGNED SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL PORTRAIT BY PAUL TREVILLION

“Even through the bombing, I slept well at nights thinking of the reassuring smiling face of Churchill, which I had seen so many times in newspapers and newsreels. When the war ended in 1945, little did I realise that ten years later I was to meet Sir Winston Churchill.”

On Churchill’s 80th birthday, in 1954, renowned artist Graham Sutherland painted a full-length portrait of the Prime Minister that Churchill famously hated and never put on display. Sutherland’s portrait is said to have been destroyed by Lady Clementine. [It was.—ed.]

One year later, Paul decided to present Churchill with a more flattering likeness, painted to portray the Churchill the artist had found comfort in during the war. In the Trevillion portrait, the Prime Minister is smiling, eyes full of playful self-assurance.

Paul’s portrait was delivered to Churchill via Bernard Sunley, a friend of Churchill’s and a client of designer and architect Lazslo Hoenig, for whom Paul was working as a designer.

“Imagine my surprise when, a week later, sitting working in Hoenig’s studio, I was told that Sir Winston Churchill was on the phone,” said Paul.

“‘Hello,’ Churchill said, in his deep voice. ‘Is that Trevillion?’ I said, ‘Yes.’

“He said, ‘Winston here. I will be at the Bernard Sunley Buildings, Berkeley Square, on Wednesday, 10.30. Oblige.’

“I did, and when I walked into the boardroom of the Sunley Buildings to meet Sir Winston Churchill, I found him seated facing the door. He never got up. As I shook his hand, he smiled and said, ‘When were you born?’ I said, ‘1934.’

“‘So you were five when war was declared? Were you evacuated?’ I said, ‘No, I didn’t get evacuated.’ Churchill nodded. ‘And where were you living?’

“‘London,’ I replied. Churchill smiled, ‘So, you are a boy from the Blitz!’

“Churchill picked up my portrait, and I said, ‘I tried to capture the confident smile that reassured me as a little boy that we would win the war.’ Still smiling, Churchill said, ‘I like this painting very much.’

“And I heard myself saying, ‘It would be nice to have that in writing!’

“‘I will do more,’ replied Churchill. ‘I will sign it.’”

The signed portrait of Churchill is on display at the National Football Museum, Manchester.


Drawn to the stars: Sketchy memories of Sir Alf and his ilk

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To label Paul Trevillion a cartoonist is rather like calling Lionel Messi a footballer: it offers just a hint of the whole story.

Trevillion may be best known for the "You Are The Ref" comic strip, but his life less ordinary sounds rather like a sporting equivalent of "Forrest Gump" – a journey that has brought him into contact with many of the greatest names of the past half-century in the world of sport and beyond. As he puts it: "I've drawn everybody, I've been around a long time."

He was 21 when, in 1955, his portrait of Winston Churchill earned him an appointment for tea with the retired Prime Minister, who was so taken by Trevillion's drawing that he signed it. By that stage the Duke of Edinburgh had already offered his encouragement at an awards ceremony at Mansion House where Trevillion told him: "I draw sports stars."

The rest is a long and colourful history that takes in so much more than illustrating "Roy of the Rovers" and the "Gary Player Golf Class" instructional strip that was syndicated in 1,500 newspapers worldwide. This, after all, is the flamboyant figure who devised an image makeover for Don Revie's "Dirty Leeds", created a split-hand golf putting technique, spent 15 years as a stand-up comedian and was also the world speed-kissing champion.

Yet the constant thread in his life's work has been a wish to capture sport's great and good, usually in ink drawings – his output over a six-decade Fleet Street career earning him the moniker "The Master of Movement".

"People sit on deckchairs and watch the sea come in all day long. People love horses, they love movement," he says. And in his eyes one sport stands out. "The greatest sport for movement, real movement, is boxing. That is the ultimate. In football you're trying to score a goal, in boxing you're fighting for your life." He would like to have boxed himself but was told by Sugar Ray Robinson: "No way, you've got no balance."

Thankfully, Trevillion had his own God-given talent. "I could draw before I could talk." He still sleeps with a pencil under his pillow, and still remains in demand, having recently contributed his comic art realism to "The Footballers' Guidebook", a mental-health tome being issued by the Professional Footballers' Association. He is now working on his autobiography, "Drawn to Life", which, with a film deal signed, is being turned concurrently into a screenplay. If it is anything like two hours in the company of this breathless raconteur, 77 years young, it will be a treat.

"Drawn to Life" will be published next year by Great Northern Books

Click on the gallery above to see the drawings

I love this sketch – it's great fun for an artist to do a reverse image. Why did Pele like it? Because I did a Michael Jackson for him – I have made him white. He loved that because it's a striking image. I've met Pele lots of times and the essence of him is he is still nine years old. That is why he still looks so young, and I've never known anybody with such enthusiasm. I once asked Pele's mentor, Professor Julio Mazzei, who coached him at New York Cosmos, the difference between him and Maradona. He said Pele could not move at the speed Maradona did, but Maradona did it all on his own, whereas Pele didn't have to. Pele did the assist for the greatest goal in World Cup history by Carlos Alberto in the 1970 final – I was talking about that when I met Carlos Alberto at Soccerex in Manchester the other week. I asked him: "What's your memory of Pele?" He said: "I was the only one in the team who was allowed to say, 'Come and do some work' because he would never come back and help the defence."

I used to go to the Cliff at Man United to see Besty and he'd always be the only one left, kicking a ball about with some kids outside. I worked with George for 20 months, doing a strip called "The Best way to play football" in the Sunday People. I drew this when I was with him, and Gordon Taylor now has the original in the PFA offices. I sent a copy to his sister and she said: "That's my brother." He could draw a bit himself – he once told me he did the drawings of the Snow White dwarves as a boy. He was the best-looking guy I've ever seen and he never said no. When you were sitting with George, a girl would come over and he'd say: "I'll be with you in a minute, love." And then another would come up. There'd be about six of them in the end and George would say: "But which one do you think was the best?" Sometimes when we were doing the strip he would phone me up in the middle of the night and give his excuses – I had not seen him and had to do the sketches blind. I'd say: "George, it's four in the morning." And he'd tell me: "I've just come back from a morning run." He was sleeping with all these birds.

My father wouldn't let me paint in oils, because if you paint in ink you are finished, that is the end of it. But this is one of the best things I've done in oils, even if when I look at it I want to do the ear better. I did Lineker's "Striker" handbook in the early '90s and went to his house. He was like Noël Coward, the way he picked everything up [mimes dainty movements]. He had these lovely paintings of animals by the wildlife artist, David Shepherd – the tiger, the elephant. Gazza's house was the opposite – he was my neighbour when he was at Spurs and he had a massive China leopard in the house and there was a Mars bar in its mouth. I went on the training ground with them at Tottenham, and Lineker was the master of reading the ball in the air. He told me his brother was 10 times the footballer he was but he wanted to be the best and he used to run as if there was a shelf under his chin, so he knew where the ball was. He could read the flight of a ball better than anyone. Paul Stewart hit one ball and as soon as it left his foot, Lineker said to me: "Paul go over there" and I could have caught it.

I love boxing and Oscar De La Hoya is the best-looking boxer there's ever been – you wouldn't think he'd ever been in a fight. I spoke to his agent and he told me to come up to Bear Mountain, where he was training in California. "He will give you five minutes," he said. I watched them bandage his hands. Then I wanted to see how quick he was so I got in the ring with him. I said: "Just throw one." He said: "I've thrown it." I never saw it. He said: "The opponent doesn't see it either, he just feels it." He showed me the cream on the back of his glove – the sun cream from my skin. When I showed him the picture, he laughed and said: "I've got four hands." I said: "You're that good, you're that quick." I did a drawing for the invitation for his foundation's dinner where he sat me next to Nicole Kidman. She asked me to draw her with her make-up pencil. I got a contract from Oscar to do all his programmes but I wanted other challenges.

I grew up on Love Lane, Tottenham, and my father took me to my first game at White Hart Lane when I was three. When I went to football, the first thing I wanted to do was come home and draw the footballers, and I used to draw all the Spurs players. In 1949, I drew Alf Ramsey heading the ball and presented it to him. He wanted to tear it up and told me: "I don't head the ball. If you want a picture of someone heading, do Nat Lofthouse, do Jackie Milburn, don't do me – get me passing." I learnt a big lesson from that. For this picture (above), I drew him in the sun. I showed him it after a game at Wembley. He'd left the England job by then and was walking to a car park away from the stadium. I asked him: "Why aren't you parked in Wembley?" He said: "I'm no longer the manager." I asked him what he thought of the picture and he said: "You can finally get me."

This was done in five minutes – they called him the "Ball of fire" and this was a ball of fire. He is very red, he had red hair and I drew it like a circle, but a circle of lines. Bally watched me do it and laughed. Everything on it is round. I do a lot of straight lines in my work and Milt Neil, the Disney animator, said to me: "You do mini-animation." I said: "What do you mean?" He said: "You cheat with your movement. You do three movements in one. You start a movement and take it to the next stage and finish it in a third stage. It is a mini-animation – that is why they move." I don't do better than Alan Ball. He loved it – he had it in his hall.

Before Wimbledon one year in the '70s I did this sketch of Evonne Goolagong in the nude for The Sun. It caused a controversy and was even raised in Parliament, but she had the greatest body I've ever seen. If I don't see them I won't draw them so I met her before drawing her. I said: "Your backhand is so good, it's such a hard shot." She said it was the easiest shot. She got a hat and put it on the hat stand like that [mimics backhand movement]. As she was moving I was watching her body. I asked her to stand up for a moment and to turn around. "Why Paul?" she asked. "I just want to look at you." Then she saw herself in The Sun – she really believes I saw her in the dressing room with no clothes on. I didn't. I know bodies enough. In most of my drawings there are no clothes on before finishing.

I came back from the States where I'd worked for Mark McCormack and seen how much fun sport was over there – before and after the actual game. I wanted to do something here, getting players to run out together. I went to Don Revie and he laughed and that's why I drew him laughing. He said: "You've convinced me, now convince the boys." And I did. They ran out 15 minutes before kick-off and there were 12 of them, four in each corner, and then they all joined up. Les Cocker, Revie's coach, did the choreography. I started this sketch in 1972 but never finished it until I found it again recently. I gave it to Duncan Revie at Soccerex and he said: "That's the smile I saw – it's my dad, not the football manager." I saw something at Leeds I'd never seen before – they all got on. It was like a family and even Duncan said to me: "I was the 18th son."

When England regained the Ashes for the first time in 19 years in 1953, I was at the Oval and did a drawing of Alec Bedser. It was raining and I thought the rain had ruined it but I showed it to him and he said he liked it and wrote on it: "Best wishes Alec B." I had wanted to draw him so much but in my life I couldn't draw as badly as I did then. I was determined to draw him again. I went up to him with this in 1998 and he said: "That's fantastic" and signed it. I like the movement in cricket and he loved the bowling action. I showed him the original one and he said: "I still prefer this one!" He wondered why I still had it and I said: "Because you signed it."

It is not the movement with Tiger, it's the stare. I like the way he steps into his own vacuum. I know the man who manages Tiger at Nike and they arrange for me to go over there when he is practising. I just sit and watch him, and that is how he looks. It is no good saying "hello Tiger" – I've talked to Tiger and he's just not heard me. He is in his own world. I watch Lee Westwood and see him looking at the scoreboard you put Westwood with Tiger and he is thinking about what Tiger is doing. But there is nobody there when Tiger plays. When Tiger leaves the course people say, "Oh he doesn't sign autographs" but to him they're not there. Concentration is the key. I used to work with Lee Trevino and he was the master of cracking a gag, he would laugh with the gallery but then suddenly – whoosh – he was gone. He could turn his concentration on and off. If Westwood had half that concentration he might win things.


LIMITED EDITIONS STILL AVAILABLE FOR A LIMITED TIME

The 1960–61 season was Tottenham Hotspur Football Club’s 43rd of competitive football and 11th consecutive year in the English top flight. It was also the club’s most successful year ever up to that point, as they won the Football League First Division for the second time and the FA Cup for the third time, thus becoming the first English club to achieve the league and FA Cup Double in the modern era. This year, to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of that year, Mooney and Lambert is proud to bring you My Eyes Have Seen the Glory.

Forty legends of White Hart Lane from the double era to the modern-day re-live, in their own words, what it was like to play for, play against, watch and manage the mighty Spurs.

This unique book assembles the largest-ever group of Legends to be interviewed about Tottenham Hotspur Football Club in one place including: Darren Anderton, Ossie Ardiles, Ray Clemence, Alfie Conn, Jermain Defoe, Alan Gilzean, Micky Hazard, Glenn Hoddle, Martin Jol, Cliff Jones, Ledley King, Gary Mabbutt, Alan Mullery, Harry Redknapp, and Steve Perryman. Their passion and deep admiration for the club shines through.

Featuring wonderful illustrations by the legendary sports artist and illustrator Paul Trevillion and incredible photos by Colorsport.

We get to the heart of the club’s landmark successes in the double year, the subsequent attempts to emulate those achievements (including the incredible arrival of Ossie and Ricky) and the cup successes of the ‘80s through to Tottenham’s recent re-emergence at the higher end of the table once more, playing in one of the greatest club stadiums in the world.

My Eyes Have Seen the Glory is a must-read for all Spurs fans who are fascinated by Tottenham Hotspur’s rich history, and want to relive at first hand the glory, dedication, commitment, trials and tribulations shown inside the dressing room – and on the hallowed pitch of White Hart Lane.

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The perfect putting method

1. The putting stance

As Sugar Ray Robinson said, the width your feet are apart with your natural walking stride is the perfect platform for your body weight. So that is your putting stance. Check it out: drop a ball on the floor and walk up to it. Stop and now bend your knees and you are as solid and as steady as a rock. No body or head movement throughout the arms and club-putting stroke.

2. The putting crouch

Tilt from the waist and ensure your shoulders are parallel to the ground. The centre or axis of the putting stroke is the top of the spine between the shoulder blades. You could ask someone to place a tray across your back and balance a drinking glass on top and the liquid in the glass would be perfectly level.


Trevillian History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Trevillian history begins in Cornwall, a rugged coastal region in southwestern England. Quite distinct from Devon, the adjoining county, Cornwall had its own spoken language until the late 18th century. The Trevillian history began here. The manner in which hereditary surnames arose is interesting. Local surnames were derived from where the original bearer lived, was born, or held land. Unlike most Celtic peoples, who favored patronymic names, the Cornish predominantly used local surnames. The Trevillian family originally lived in Cornwall, at the manor of Trevelyan, in the parish of St. Veep.

Treville St., Plymouth (mentioned in the Corporation books of 1494-5 as "Trevyllys-strete"), commemorates an old merchant family long resident there. [1]

Set of 4 Coffee Mugs and Keychains

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Early Origins of the Trevillian family

The surname Trevillian was first found in Cornwall where this "Cornish family traced to Nicholas de Trevelyan living in the reign of Edward I, whose ancestors were of Trevelyan, in the parish of St. Velap, near Fowey, [in Cornwall] at a still earlier period." [2]

Another reference states "in 1273 Felicia, wife of William de Bodrugan, confirmed to Andrew, Trevelyan and Cumi and to Nicholas de Trevelyan her son." [3] Continuing, "Trevelien was [in] 1086 part of the great barony held by Offels from the Earl of Cornwall." [3]

Little Shelford in Cambridgeshire was home to another branch of the family. "In the chancel of the church is a monument to Sir John de Treville, a Knight Templar, and lord of the manor, with his figure in a recumbent position: a skeleton encased in lead was dug up near the altar in 1824, the hair of it being in a perfect state." [4]

"Basil, or Basill, [in the parish of St. Cleather] hath for many ages been the seat of the worshipful family of the Trevillians, or Trevelyans. Respecting this family a tradition uniformly prevailed, that in a very remote period, when that tract of land which once formed the country of Lyonesse near Penzance was inundated, either by the submersion of the ground, or the violent encroachment of the sea, an ancestor of the Trevillians who resided in these parts, mounted on a white horse, continued to buffet the waves until he safely-reached the continent of Cornwall. To commemorate this singular preservation, the event is said to have given the family arms, which are 'In a field gules, a demi-horse, argent, issuing out of the waves of the sea, azure.' " [5]

"The family of Trevillian or Trevelyan, resided for several ages in Cornwall, having a seat at Trevelyan, in St. Veep, and another at Basil. In the reign of Edward IV. they removed into Somersetshire, in consequence of a marriage with the heiress of Whalesborowe, who possessed Nettlecombe in Somersetshire." [5]

We did find this interesting entry about the Treville variant: " Edward I. granted lands at Helston 'by the tenure of grand sergeantry to William de Treville, on condition of his bringing a fish hook or iron crook and a boat and net, at his own proper costs and charges, for the King's fishing in the lake of Helston (Loo Pool), whenever the King should come to Helston, and as long as he should tarry there. From this I conclude that this William de Treville either had been or was Keeper of the royalty of this lake or pool by inheritance and held one Cornish acre of land, that is to say, one hundred and eighty English acres, in Eglesderry by the tenure of Serjeancy for that purpose." [5]

The Trevilles were seated at Ethy or Tethe in the parish of St. Winnow. They continued for about four hundred years longer. Richard de Trevill occurs in Bucks 1194-98 (Rotul. Curiae Regis). Saier de Trivilla witnesses Robert de Stuteville's grant to Wendling Abbey, Norfolk (Mon. Angl.). "The family of Treville possessed Rosemaund, Herefordshire. Of these, Alexander Treville (younger brother and heir of Baldwin, heir of Richard, heir of Baldwin), is stated to have had 'fayre lands in the counties of Hereford and Norfolk temp. Edward I." [1]

Alec Trevelyan (006), also known as Janus, was a fictional character and the main antagonist in the 1995 James Bond film GoldenEye.


Mementos Memorabilia

This is your opportunity to purchase a professionally framed, limited edition Paul Trevillion artwork commissioned by Mementos Memorabilia to celebrate five of the greatest West Bromwich Albion Goal Scoring Legends.

Paul Trevillion
Paul Trevillion is a globally acclaimed sports artist who has been acknowledged as 'the Pele of Sporting Art.' He has painted hundreds of sporting legends from around the world in his eighty year sporting art lifetime.

With his extraordinary artistic talent first discovered at school, Trevillion's natural gift in taking the medium of pen and ink to its limitations and beyond, has resulted in a ground breaking career in the world of sporting art which has seen his original work published in the USA, Europe, Australia, Japan and South Africa.

Acknowledged as 'the best black and white artist in the business,' Trevillion has devised and illustrated instructional-based art for almost every national Newspaper in the UK. His breakthrough came in the Sunday People in 1957, with the 'Hey Ref' series. Over sixty years later, his renamed series 'You Are The Ref' is a cult classic football strip which appeared weekly in the Sunday Observer and Guardian Online. Trevillion is recognised as the Roy of the Rovers artist, whose visionary 'Comic Art Realism' style took Roy from a comic football character to a real-life football hero - "a man who never lived, but has lived forever."

Trevillion's art is recognised for it's ability to bring a subject to life, taking a static image and creating a moving figure, earning him the title 'The Master of Movement'. He is the artist and author of over 20 books, which have sold worldwide and his work has been displayed at the FIFA museum, National Football Museum and the Strand Gallery in London.

Trevillion's love of sport has driven his artistic career and, although a Tottenham Hotspur fan, he has been a long time ally of West Bromwich Albion in raising money for the Celebration Statue and as a friend and supporter of Jeff Astle and the Justice For Jeff Campaign.

Commissioning this Artwork
As a lifelong Albion supporter and a great admirer of Trevillion's work, Mementos Memorabilia are honoured to have had such an incredible opportunity to commission this artwork as a tribute to five of the greatest West Bromwich Albion Goal Scoring Legends of modern times. It is a privilege for such a renowned sports artist to capture these Legends of our club's history and to commemorate their contribution to the club in a piece of art which we can all enjoy.

The Goal Scoring Legends, Ronnie Allen, Jeff Astle, Tony Brown, Cyrille Regis and Bob Taylor, are five of the many iconic players who have played at the Hawthorns. Mementos Memorabilia asked Trevillion to capture these five as each of them have a special importance to many Albion fans, as players whose goal scoring attributes have deemed them to be considered Legends.

Goal Scoring Legends
Growing up, goal scorers are our boyhood heroes. Selecting just five to be represented here was a difficult task as there are many more great players who could be commemorated, but these are five fan favourites who have impressed on the lives of many current West Bromwich Albion supporters.

The older generation among us will reminisce about Ronnie Allen and his two goals in the 1954 FA Cup Final victory.

The King to all Albion fans is Jeff Astle, who scored in every round including the final, when winning the FA Cup in 1968 . He lead the Albion line and was a brilliant header of a football.

A constant strength within the team, during the 1960's to 1980's, was Tony Brown who scored goal after goal for the Albion. To this day, he holds the accolade of the highest goal scorer in the clubs history.

Cyrille Regis is remembered not only for his sheer strength and the excitement he brought to a super Albion team in the late 70's, but for his composed and trail blazing attitude when enduring racism from opposition fans.

And finally, Bob Taylor who lit up the Hawthorns after some dark days with his goals and gave us all hope again - particularly when he scored the goal which resulted in our promotion to the Premier League in the 2001/02 season.

Purchasing A Print
Each of the three hundred limited edition prints are hand signed by Paul Trevillion and living legends Tony Brown and Bob Taylor. The cost of £250 includes the professional framing, by West Bromwich Albion's preferred framing specialist, and UK delivery of the print, as well as a certificate of authenticity and a charitable donation.

In purchasing a frame you are facilitating the donation of up to 25 framed prints to charities associated with the club and the players, including The Albion Foundation, The Cyrille Regis Legacy Trust, The Jeff Astle Foundation and The Former Players Association, for use in their fundraising activities.

This is a once in a lifetime investment piece of West Bromwich Albion memorabilia - an opportunity for you to collect a WBA artwork by Paul Trevillion, signed by two of the club's legends. Just looking at it will bring wonderful memories flooding back of the unforgettable games played by these iconic legends.


World’s only portrait signed by Churchill displayed

Born in 1934, Paul was a schoolboy during the Second World War. He told MHM, ‘My school desk faced a large poster hanging on the school wall, it had the face of Churchill and the words “LET US GO FORWARD TOGETHER”.

‘Our schoolteacher, Miss Stevens, each Monday morning would stand beside the poster and spell out the same message: “Remember children, you are all soldiers without uniforms. When the air-raid siren sounds you must stand to attention and then, in an orderly fashion, march to the air-raid shelter in the playground. The front row will lead off followed by the second row, and so on.” This order of marching to the shelter rotated with each air-raid warning.

‘Even through the bombing, I slept well at nights thinking of the reassuring smiling face of Churchill which I had seen so many times in newspapers and newsreels. When the war ended in 1945, little did I realise that ten years later I was to meet Sir Winston Churchill.’

On Churchill’s 80th birthday, in 1954, renowned artist Graham Sutherland painted a full-length portrait of the Prime Minister that Churchill famously hated and never put on display. Sutherland’s portrait is said to have been destroyed by Lady Clementine.

One year later, Paul decided to present Churchill with a more  flattering likeness, painted to portray the Churchill the artist had found comfort in during the war. In the Trevillion portrait, the Prime Minister is smiling, eyes full of playful self-assurance.

Paul’s portrait was delivered to Churchill via Bernard Sunley, a friend of Churchill’s and a client of designer and architect Lazslo Hoenig, for whom Paul was working as a designer.

‘Imagine my surprise when, a week later, sitting working in Hoenig’s studio, I was told that Sir Winston Churchill was on the phone,’ said Paul.

‘“Hello,” Churchill said, in his deep voice. “Is that Trevillion?” I said, “Yes.”

‘He said, “Winston here. I will be at the Bernard Sunley Buildings, Berkeley Square, on Wednesday, 10.30. Oblige.”

‘I did, and when I walked into the boardroom of the Sunley Buildings to meet Sir Winston Churchill I found him seated facing the door. He never got up. As I shook his hand, he smiled and said, “When were you born?” I said, “1934.”

‘“So you were  five when war was declared? Were you evacuated?” I said, “No, I didn’t get evacuated.” Churchill nodded. “And where were you living?”

“London,” I replied. Churchill smiled, “So, you are a boy from the Blitz!”

‘Churchill picked up my portrait and I said, “I tried to capture the confident smile that reassured me as a little boy that we would win the war.” Still smiling, Churchill said, “I like this painting very much.”

‘And I heard myself saying, “It would be nice to have that in writing!”

‘“I will do more,” replied Churchill. “I will sign it.”’ The signed portrait of Churchill is on display at the National Football Museum, Manchester.


Contents

The evolution of the strip began in 1952 in the Tottenham Hotspur magazine The Lillywhite, which featured a cartoon quiz by Paul Trevillion. The quiz included one question per issue on refereeing. Five years later, The People newspaper signed Trevillion to produce a dedicated refereeing cartoon quiz, and gave it the title Hey Ref. ΐ]

In the 1960s, the strip began appearing in a much larger format alongside Trevillion's work for Roy of the Rovers in official Roy annuals, under the title If You Were The Ref. But it was in 1969 that the strip took on its famous name, when it moved to be part of newly launched children's football magazine Shoot. The strip continued to run until 1983. ΐ]

In 2006, Trevillion agreed to return to You Are The Ref, producing new artwork for the strip for the first time in over 20 years, which was published in The Observer newspaper. Later that year, a book was published collecting the history of the strip. In 2008, You Are The Ref also appeared on the BBC's Euro 2008 blog, and on The Guardian's website. ΐ] Currently the strip relies on reader submissions for the three questions posed each week. As well as the illustrated questions, each strip includes a portrait of a well-known footballing person.

In June 2010, in advance of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, You Are The Ref was released as an iPhone / iPod Touch game developed by game developer Four Door Lemon. Α]


Watch the video: Trevillion Artbox full length cut 1920x1080 (May 2022).


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